Friday, May 7, 2010

Tears for Tennessee

My aunt and uncle are both in mid 80's. He is blind now and can barely walk after a stroke. They live in Nashville, TN scene of the devestating flooding last weekend. Today was the first day we could get down there to help them salvage items. Last Sunday we spent the day on the phone with her trying to get them to get out as the water approached their house. They finally were evacuated Sunday evening. The area they lived in was the Lakeshore community by Opryland Hotel (also flooded). The waters of the Cumberland swallowed their homes and left behind a trail of debris, tears, fears but also hope, charity, strength and hometown pride. Tennessee is called "The Volunteer State" and justly deserves that name. As we worked today, truck and cars pulled up offering drinks, granola bars, sandwichs, boxes, trashbags, cleaning supplies. Church volunteers came by with clipboards to talk to each homeowner to see what they could do to help. It was incredible. When we left Nashville today we saw a mobile kitchen set up in a shopping parking lot feeding people. People were also dropping off supplies there. The national media hasn't shown even a drop of interest when compared to the flood of attention New Orleans received after Katrina. But it hasn't deterred the spirit of the people of Tennessee. Here are a few pictures we took today. I think they tell the story of tears as lives and homes were upended and left in puddles and piles.








My aunt and uncle are both in mid 80's. He is blind now and can barely walk after a stroke. They live in Nashville, TN scene of the devestating flooding last weekend. Today was the first day we could get down there to help them salvage items. Last Sunday we spent the day on the phone with her trying to get them to get out as the water approached their house. They finally were evacuated Sunday evening. The area they lived in was the Lakeshore community by Opryland Hotel (also flooded). The waters of the Cumberland swallowed their homes and left behind a trail of debris, tears, fears but also hope, charity, strength and hometown pride. Tennessee is called "The Volunteer State" and justly deserves that name. As we worked today, truck and cars pulled up offering drinks, granola bars, sandwichs, boxes, trashbags, cleaning supplies. Church volunteers came by with clipboards to talk to each homeowner to see what they could do to help. It was incredible. When we left Nashville today we saw a mobile kitchen set up in a shopping parking lot feeding people. People were also dropping off supplies there. The national media hasn't shown even a drop of interest when compared to the flood of attention New Orleans received after Katrina. But it hasn't deterred the spirit of the people of Tennessee. Here are a few pictures we took today. I think they tell the story of tears as lives and homes were upended and left in puddles and piles.

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